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Itivuttaka

Itivuttaka 53 Duttiya Vedanā Sutta
Feelings 2

The Buddha explains how one should think of the three types of feelings we encounter in life.

This discourse was taught by the Blessed One, taught by the Arahant, the fully enlightened Supreme Buddha. This is as I heard,

“Monks, there are three types of feeling. What three? Pleasant feeling, unpleasant feeling, and neither-pleasant-nor-unpleasant feeling.

Monks, the pleasant feeling should be seen as suffering, the unpleasant feeling should be seen as an arrow, and the neither-pleasant-nor-unpleasant feeling should be seen as impermanent.

When a monk has seen the pleasant feeling as suffering, the unpleasant feeling as an arrow, and the neither-pleasant-nor-unpleasant feeling as impermanent, then he is called a monk who is noble, who has seen rightly, and who has cut off craving and has smashed the fetters. Through seeing conceit as it actually is, he has put an end to suffering.”

This is the meaning of what the Blessed One said. So, with regard to this, it was said:

The monk has seen the pleasant feeling as suffering, the unpleasant feeling as an arrow, and the peaceful neither-pleasant-nor-unpleasant feeling as impermanent.

Such a monk who has seen rightly is thereby liberated from defilements. He has mastered his life with supreme wisdom. He is the peaceful sage who has overcome the four-fold bonds.

This, too, is the meaning of what was said by the Blessed One. This is exactly as I heard.

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Itivuttaka 53 Duttiya Vedanā Sutta: Feelings 2

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