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Itivuttaka

Itivuttaka 111 Sampannasīla Sutta
Possess Virtue

The Buddha tells monks to live a virtuous life, to live with restraint and with courteous behavior.

This discourse was taught by the Blessed One, taught by the Arahant, the fully enlightened Supreme Buddha. This is as I heard,

“Monks, live a virtuous life, following the codes of discipline. Live with the restraint of the rules of discipline, and with courteous behavior. Having undertaken the training rules, train yourselves, seeing danger in the slightest faults.

Monks, when one lives a virtuous life, follows the codes of discipline, lives with the restraint of the rules of discipline, and has courteous behaviour; when one, having undertaken the training rules, trains oneself, seeing danger in the slightest faults—what more is to be done?

Monks, if, while he is walking, a monk is free from greed and ill will, free from sleepiness and drowsiness, free from restlessness and remorse, and has abandoned doubts, his energy becomes strong and firm, his mindfulness is established and unclouded, his body is tranquil and calm, and his mind is concentrated and one-pointed. A monk who in this manner is energetic and afraid of wrongdoing is often and continually called energetic and firm in the goal of ultimate freedom, Nibbāna.

Monks, if, while he is standing, a monk is free from greed and ill will, free from sleepiness and drowsiness, free from restlessness and remorse, and has abandoned doubts, his energy becomes strong and firm, his mindfulness is established and unclouded, his body is tranquil and calm, and his mind is concentrated and one-pointed. A monk who in this manner is energetic and afraid of wrongdoing is often and continually called energetic and firm in the goal of ultimate freedom, Nibbāna.

Monks, if, while he is sitting, a monk is free from greed and ill will, free from sleepiness and drowsiness, free from restlessness and remorse, and has abandoned doubts, his energy becomes strong and firm, his mindfulness is established and unclouded, his body is tranquil and calm, and his mind is concentrated and one-pointed. A monk who in this manner is energetic and afraid of wrongdoing is often and continually called energetic and firm in the goal of ultimate freedom, Nibbāna.

Monks, if, while he is lying down, a monk is free from greed and ill will, free from sleepiness and drowsiness, free from restlessness and remorse, and has abandoned doubts, his energy becomes strong and firm, his mindfulness is established and unclouded, his body is tranquil and calm, and his mind is concentrated and one-pointed. A monk who in this manner is energetic and afraid of wrongdoing is often and continually called energetic and firm in the goal of ultimate freedom, Nibbāna.”

This is the meaning of what the Blessed One said. So, with regard to this, it was said:

Controlled in walking, in standing, in sitting, in lying down, and in flexing and extending his limbs—above, across, and below as far as the world extends, a monk insightfully observes how the five aggregates of clinging arise and pass away.

A monk who lives energetically, who is not restless and who lives at peace—always mindful, training in the path conducive to calming the mind—such a monk is known as one who is firm in the goal of ultimate freedom, Nibbāna.

This, too, is the meaning of what was said by the Blessed One. This is exactly as I heard.

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Itivuttaka 111 Sampannasīla Sutta: Possess Virtue

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